Jesus in the Old Testament, Part 4: Christophanies

Grace For The Journey

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13Sept   This is the fourth blog in our series on how the Bible is all about Jesus.  We have looked at of the events that God instituted in the Old Testament that point to Jesus.  We learned about Jesus in the Old Testament is through titles.  Yesterday we learned about how the prophecies in the Old Testament teach us about Who Jesus is, what He would do, and even where He would be born.

Jesus as the eternally existing Son of God, the second member of the Trinity, is demonstrated through His various appearances throughout the Old Testament.  This is another way we learn about Jesus and see how the Bible is all about Jesus.  Theologians what theologians call . . .

Christophonies

Since no one has seen or can see God the Father (Exodus. 33:20; John 1:18, 5:37, 6:46; 1 Timothy 6:15–16), most theologians believe the times in the Old Testament where God is “seen” refer to Jesus Christ.  Let’s look at a few examples:

The Book of Genesis

In the book of Genesis we observe a couple of Christophanies.  First, in Genesis 18, Abraham has a conversation with a man who is God.  That’s Jesus.  Basically Jesus shows up, talks with Abraham, and reveals details about the fate of Sodom.

Second, in Genesis 32:22–32, Jacob gets into an all-night, UFC-style wrestling match with somebody.  Though this man never reveals His name to Jacob, Jacob’s all-night wrestling match appears to have been with Jesus.

After struggling all night, I imagine Jacob thought to himself at the end of the fight, “I held in there all night. That was a long fight. I’m pretty tough.” Jesus says, “I could’ve taken you at any point,” and then reaches out His finger, touches Jacob’s hip, and cripples him.  Afterwards, Jacob realized he was wrestling with God.  The Bible records that even in Genesis 32:30 where it says, “So Jacob called the name of the Place Peniel (face of God): ‘For I have seen God face to face and my life is preserved.’”

The Book of Daniel

In the story of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, these three men wouldn’t bow down and worship the golden image made by King Nebuchadnezzar.  As a consequence, he had them thrown into a fiery furnace.  The Bible tells us in Daniel 3:19-25 that after they were thrown into the furnace that was heated seven times hotter than it usually was and the king looked in a saw a four person walking in the midst of the fire whose appearance “is like the Son of God.”

The Book of Isaiah

One of my favorite Christophanies is in Isaiah 6. The Bible says in the first 3 verses of chapter 6, “In the year that King Uzziah died, Isaiah said that he “saw the Lord high and exalted and seated on a throne; and the train of His robe filled the temple.  And the angels surrounded Him.  And day and night they worship Him, crying out: ‘Holy, holy, holy is the LORD God Almighty; heaven and earth are full of His glory!’”

After seeing such a lofty vision, Isaiah responded, “And I’m a man of unclean lips. I’ve said some things I shouldn’t have said. And I come from a people of unclean lips. I’m a dead man. I’ve seen the LORD” (Isaiah 6:5).  Then an angel takes a hot coal, presses it to his lips and says. “Your sin is atoned for; you’re a new man now. Your mouth now belongs to me. You’re going to be a prophet and say what I tell you to say” (Isaiah 6:6–7).

The question we need to answer is this: Who did Isaiah see?  The Bible says in John 12:39-41, Therefore they could not believe, because Isaiah said again: ‘He has blinded their eyes and hardened their hearts, lest they should see with their eyes, lest they should understand with their hearts and turn, so that I should heal them’  These things Isaiah said when he saw His glory and spoke of Him.”

Isaiah’s encounter with Jesus is the same picture that John has of Jesus in the book of Revelation.  It’s the same picture of Jesus that you and I will have when we see Him face to face (Revelation 1:9-17).  No longer a humble, marginalized, beaten, poor Galilean peasant, but the risen, ruling, reigning, resurrected, glorious King of kings, Lord of lords, high and exalted, worshiped by angels, adored by nations: the Lord Jesus Christ, “Who was and is and is to come.” (Revelation 1:8).

This is God’s Word For Today … This Is Grace For The Journey

Rest and Rejoice in this eternal truth!

Pastor Terry

Ephesians 4:7 – “But to each one of us grace has been given as Christ apportioned it.”

Hebrews 4:16 – “Let us then approach the throne of grace with confidence, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help us in our time of need.”

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Jesus in the Old Testament, Part 3: Prophecies

Grace For The Journey

2018BlogTheme

13Sept  This is the fourth blog in our series on how the Bible is all about Jesus.  We have looked at of the events that God instituted in the Old Testament that point to Jesus.  We learned about Jesus in the Old Testament is through titles.  Yesterday we learned about how the prophecies in the Old Testament teach us about Who Jesus is, what He would do, and even where He would be born.

Jesus as the eternally existing Son of God, the second member of the Trinity, is demonstrated through His various appearances throughout the Old Testament.  This is another way we learn about Jesus and see how the Bible is all about Jesus.  Theologians what theologians call . . .

Christophonies

Since no one has seen or can see God the Father (Exodus. 33:20; John 1:18, 5:37, 6:46; 1 Timothy 6:15–16), most theologians believe the times in the Old Testament where God is “seen” refer to Jesus Christ.  Let’s look at a few examples:

The Book of Genesis

In the book of Genesis we observe a couple of Christophanies.  First, in Genesis 18, Abraham has a conversation with a man who is God.  That’s Jesus.  Basically Jesus shows up, talks with Abraham, and reveals details about the fate of Sodom.

Second, in Genesis 32:22–32, Jacob gets into an all-night, UFC-style wrestling match with somebody.  Though this man never reveals His name to Jacob, Jacob’s all-night wrestling match appears to have been with Jesus.

After struggling all night, I imagine Jacob thought to himself at the end of the fight, “I held in there all night. That was a long fight. I’m pretty tough.” Jesus says, “I could’ve taken you at any point,” and then reaches out His finger, touches Jacob’s hip, and cripples him.  Afterwards, Jacob realized he was wrestling with God.  The Bible records that even in Genesis 32:30 where it says, “So Jacob called the name of the Place Peniel (face of God): ‘For I have seen God face to face and my life is preserved.’”

The Book of Daniel

In the story of Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego, these three men wouldn’t bow down and worship the golden image made by King Nebuchadnezzar.  As a consequence, he had them thrown into a fiery furnace.  The Bible tells us in Daniel 3:19-25 that after they were thrown into the furnace that was heated seven times hotter than it usually was and the king looked in a saw a four person walking in the midst of the fire whose appearance “is like the Son of God.”

The Book of Isaiah

One of my favorite Christophanies is in Isaiah 6. The Bible says in the first 3 verses of chapter 6, “In the year that King Uzziah died, Isaiah said that he “saw the Lord high and exalted and seated on a throne; and the train of His robe filled the temple.  And the angels surrounded Him.  And day and night they worship Him, crying out: ‘Holy, holy, holy is the LORD God Almighty; heaven and earth are full of His glory!’”

After seeing such a lofty vision, Isaiah responded, “And I’m a man of unclean lips. I’ve said some things I shouldn’t have said. And I come from a people of unclean lips. I’m a dead man. I’ve seen the LORD” (Isaiah 6:5).  Then an angel takes a hot coal, presses it to his lips and says. “Your sin is atoned for; you’re a new man now. Your mouth now belongs to me. You’re going to be a prophet and say what I tell you to say” (Isaiah 6:6–7).

The question we need to answer is this: Who did Isaiah see?  The Bible says in John 12:39-41, Therefore they could not believe, because Isaiah said again: ‘He has blinded their eyes and hardened their hearts, lest they should see with their eyes, lest they should understand with their hearts and turn, so that I should heal them’  These things Isaiah said when he saw His glory and spoke of Him.”

Isaiah’s encounter with Jesus is the same picture that John has of Jesus in the book of Revelation.  It’s the same picture of Jesus that you and I will have when we see Him face to face (Revelation 1:9-17).  No longer a humble, marginalized, beaten, poor Galilean peasant, but the risen, ruling, reigning, resurrected, glorious King of kings, Lord of lords, high and exalted, worshiped by angels, adored by nations: the Lord Jesus Christ, “Who was and is and is to come.” (Revelation 1:8).

This is God’s Word For Today … This Is Grace For The Journey

Rest and Rejoice in this eternal truth!

Pastor Terry

Ephesians 4:7 – “But to each one of us grace has been given as Christ apportioned it.”

Hebrews 4:16 – “Let us then approach the throne of grace with confidence, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help us in our time of need.”

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Jesus in the Old Testament, Part 2: Titles

Grace For The Journey

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12Se[t This is the second part in a series on how the Bible is all about Jesus.  Yesterday we looked at two of the events that God instituted in the Old Testament.  Another way we learn about Jesus in the Old Testament is through titles.  There is a variety of titles in the Old Testament that were ultimately attributed to Jesus.

Suffering Servant

In Isaiah – written seven hundred years before Jesus was born – beginning in chapter 40 all the way through to chapter 66, the dominating theme is about the Suffering Servant.  Though Isaiah depicts the suffering servant as the people of Israel (Isaiah 41:8) or himself (Isaiah 49:5), we observe in chapter 53 that the Suffering Servant is actually someone different.

The Suffering Servant is described as someone who bears our grief and sorrows, is pierced for our transgressions, and crushed for our iniquities (Isaiah 53:4–5).  Since the Suffering Servant was to do this work on behalf of the people of Israel and Isaiah himself, we discover in these verses that God would send someone to be a suffering Savior, namely, Jesus.

We see this in Jesus’ own words, when he says in Mark 10:45, “For even the Son of May did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many.”  The Suffering Servant is also quoted in connection to Jesus’ healing ministry in Matthew 8:17, where the Bible says, “When evening had come, they brought to Him many who were demon-possessed.  And He cast the spirits with a word, and healed all who were sick, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Isaiah the prophet, saying, ‘He Himself took our infirmities and bore our sicknesses.”  Again, in Acts 8:26-35 the Bible tells us that as an Ethiopian eunuch read from Isaiah 53, Philip joined him and informed him that Isaiah wasn’t speaking about himself, but Jesus (Acts 8:26–35).  And speaking of Jesus, Peter, in 1 Peter 2:24, quotes Isaiah 53:5 and connects it with Jesus when the Holy Spirit leads him to write, “Who Himself bore our sins in His own body on the tree, that we, having died to sing, might live for righteousness – by whose stripes you were healed.”

The Suffering Servant wasn’t the people of Israel.  He wasn’t Isaiah.  He was Jesus. Through this title we see that the Old Testament was all about Jesus just as the New Testament is.  Jesus came as the Suffering Servant to bear our sins, our grief, and sorrows, to be pierced for our transgressions, and be crushed for our iniquities.

Alpha and Omega

In the Old Testament, God is referred to as “the first and the last.”  The Bible tells us in Isaiah 41:4; 44:6 and 48:12 an important truth about God.  We hear in in these verses God say, “I am the first and I am the last; beside Mme there is no god.”

These are references to the eternal nature of God.  God is without beginning . . . God is without end.  God is eternal.  Or as someone has said, “God is the uncaused cause.”

The New Testament takes the first and last name for God and attributes it to Jesus.  The Bible tells us in Revelation 21:6 the words of Jesus to John, “I am the Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end” (cf. Rev. 1:8; 22:3).  The Bible clearly teaches that Jesus is God.  He has no beginning and no end.  Jesus is the Alpha and the Omega.

Son of Man

Jesus’ favorite title for himself is from the Old Testament: “the Son of Man.”  He uses this title roughly 80 times.  For example, in response to the high priest’s request for Jesus to say if he is the Christ, Jesus said, “You have said so.  But I tell you, from now on you will see the Son of Man seated at the right hand of Power and coming in the clouds of heaven” (Matthew 6:64; 16:27, 24:30; Mark 14:62).  Jesus isn’t merely saying that He is simply a son of a man.  We all are.  Jesus was claiming to be the Son of man as spoken of by Daniel.

For Jesus to connect himself with the title of son of man from Daniel is to connect Himself with the vision of Himself in eternal glory in heaven, ruling and reigning, coming into human history humbly as a man to set up a kingdom that’ll never end.

Jesus was crucified.  He was put to death for the charge of blasphemy by declaring Himself to be God.  He rose from death three days later.  Jesus is alive today, and He is the Son of Man spoken of by the prophet Daniel.

I AM

Another title in the Old Testament used for God revolves around the burning bush and Moses (Exodus 3).  As the Bible relates in the Book of Exodus, one day Moses walked along in the wilderness and came upon a bush that was on fire but not consumed.

I think God has a good sense of humor. Of all ways that God could have spoken with Moses, he chose to talk with him through a burning bush.

The Bible records this experience in Exodus 3.  As Moses had a conversation with God out of the burning bush, he’s told, “Go to the Pharaoh and set My people free.  Moses asked a good question. “Who should I tell them sent me?”  And  says to Moses, “Say to the people of Israel, ‘I AM has sent me to you.’”

The Bible tells us in John 8:59, that Jesus responded to the Jews’ question of Jesus on how exactly He saw Abraham who lived a couple of thousand years before him, Jesus said, “Truly, truly, I say to you, before Abraham was, I am.”  The Jews understood that Jesus was identifying Himself as God, who spoke to Moses through the burning bush, and picked up stones to throw at Him.

Jesus in essence said, “I’m the eternal God, older than Abraham, and I was the one who met with Moses in the burning bush and told Him to go liberate my people.”

We can clearly conclude from these sample titles of our Lord Jesus in the Old Testament that it is really all about Jesus.

This is God’s Word For Today … This Is Grace For The Journey

Rest and Rejoice in this eternal truth!

Pastor Terry

Ephesians 4:7 – “But to each one of us grace has been given as Christ apportioned it.”

Hebrews 4:16 – “Let us then approach the throne of grace with confidence, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help us in our time of need.”

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Jesus in the Old Testament, Part 1: Events

Grace For The Journey

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11Sept  Earlier this week I presented an overview of Jesus in the Old Testament.  My purpose was to show how the Bible is all about Jesus.  For the next several blogs I want to expand that topic as we look at specific events and teachings that demonstrate how the Bible is all about Jesus.

One way the Old Testament teaches us about Jesus is through events.  Looking back upon the various events and festivals in the Old Testament through the lens of the New Testament, we read in Colossians 2:16–17, “Therefore let no one pass judgment on you in questions of food and drink, or with regard to a festival or a new moon or a Sabbath. These are a shadow of the things to come, but the substance belongs to Jesus.

From these verses, we learn that the festivals established by God in the Old Testament were not an end in and of themselves, but rather served as a means of pointing to Jesus.  Because Jesus came and fulfilled the meaning of these various festivals, we are no longer bound to celebrate them.  Nonetheless, we learn a great deal about Jesus by simply studying these events.

There are several events that we could look at, but for brevity, let’s consider two major events in the Old Testament: the Passover; and the Day of Atonement.

The Passover

At the end of the book of Genesis, we read about Joseph’s family people suffering from a a massive famine sought refuge in Egypt.  Over the course of more than four hundred years, from Genesis to Exodus, this family grew to become the great nation of Israel (Exodus 1:1–7).  The Bible tells us that during this time, a new pharaoh arose in Egypt who didn’t know Joseph and felt threatened by Israel since they were growing in number and becoming more powerful (Exodus 1:8–10).

This new pharaoh enslaved, mistreated, abused, and hurt God’s people.  Due to the harsh treatment by pharaoh upon Israel, God heard their cries of His people and sent Moses to Egypt to deliver the Israelites from their bondage so that they would be free to worship Him.

The Book of Exodus tells us that God confronted Pharaoh, and He demanded that he “Let my people go.”  Pharaoh’s heart was hardened toward God, and he wanted to be God, kept fighting against God, and sought to go his own way.

Due to Pharaoh’s stubbornness, God sent an escalating succession of plagues and a demand to obey Him through His messenger, Moses.  Pharaoh didn’t listen, and the plagues came just as God promised, culminating in a final, devastating plague – the killing of the firstborn in Egypt by the death angel.

As a result of Pharaoh’s willful inflexibility, death came to the firstborn in every home with one exception: those homes in the nation of Israel that, in faith, scarified an animal and spread the blood of that animal over their doorpost.  This act served as a substitute, indicating that while all people were sinners deserving of death, God would in His mercy pass over the houses covered by the blood.  This event became the first Passover, which is celebrated by the Jews to this day.

Thousands of years later, John the Baptist proclaimed Jesus as “the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world!” (John 1:29).  And, as the Apostle Paul tells us, Jesus Christ is “our Passover Lamb, has been sacrificed” for us (1 Corinthians 5:7).  From this we learn that the Passover is all about Jesus.

Today, as Christians, we don’t have to celebrate the Passover.  Do you know why?  We don’t need to because Jesus fulfilled the Passover.  Jesus is our Passover sacrifice.  He shed His blood for our sin so that the wrath of God would pass over us through faith in Jesus.  We don’t need to annually celebrate the Passover because we have Jesus and we celebrate Him and what He did on the cross and through the empty tomb every day.

The Day of Atonement

The second major event that teaches us about the person and work of Jesus is called the Day of Atonement (Leviticus 16; 23:26–32).  For the Jews, the Day of Atonement is the biggest day in the Jewish calendar year.  So big, in fact, that they simply call it “the Day.”

In the Bible, the Day of Atonement was observed God’s people to make atonement for their sins.  The high priest, serving as Israel’s mediator between them and God, would fulfill the Day of Atonement through two goats, one used as the sacrificial goat and one used as the scapegoat.  Over the sacrificial goat, the high priest would confess the sins of the people and slaughter the animal as a substitute sacrifice.  The blood of that animal would be shed, and the wrath of God would be poured out on that animal in their place as a substitute.  Over the scapegoat, the high priest would confess the sins of the people but rather than being slaughtered, it would be sent away.

For Christians, Jesus is our Atonement.  His work on the cross achieved what is alluded to in this event.  He is our High Priest who mediates between God and us.  He is our sacrifice who forgives our sins.  He is our scapegoat who takes our sins away and makes us clean (Hebrews 9:7–14).  This is why we don’t celebrate Yom Kippur.   We celebrate Jesus.  The Bible teaches that Jesus is the whole point of Yom Kippur, for the event served as the preparation, anticipation, and expectation of the crucifixion of Jesus.

This is God’s Word For Today … This Is Grace For The Journey

Rest and Rejoice in this eternal truth!

Pastor Terry

Ephesians 4:7 – “But to each one of us grace has been given as Christ apportioned it.”

Hebrews 4:16 – “Let us then approach the throne of grace with confidence, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help us in our time of need.”

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Is Jesus in Every Book of the Old Testament?

Grace For The Journey

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5Sept  Allow me to encourage you today with a marvelous reality of the Old Testament.  Even though God used many different authors over many centuries, the unified theme and message is all about Jesus and what He would do to fulfill God’s promise of salvation to those who turn from their sin and accept Christ as Savior.

As you read through God’s Word, see how it points you to Jesus . . .

  • Christ is the Seed of woman and in Genesis 3:15 we are told He will one day crush Satan (Galatians 3:10) .
  • In Exodus we find the story of the Passover Lamb, and Christ is the sacrificial Lamb given for us (John 1:29).
  • In Leviticus we read of the High Priest making sacrifices for the people, and Christ has become our High Priest, making the perfect sacrifice to atone for our sins (Hebrews 5:1-10).
  • In Deuteronomy Moses prophesied of a prophet who would come that would be greater than Himself. Jesus is that Great Prophet (Hebrews 3:1).
  • In the book of Joshua, Joshua met the Captain of the Lord’s host. That man is Jesus Christ.
  • In Judges, the leaders were a judge who delivered God’s people, each of them typifying the Lord Jesus.
  • In Ruth, Boaz, the kinsman who redeemed Ruth’s inheritance, is a picture of Christ, the kinsman redeemer.
  • In 1 Samuel, David, the anointed one, pictures Jesus and Jesus is described as being the Son of David.
  • In 2 Samuel when the king is being enthroned, the entire scene is descriptive of the Lord Jesus.
  • The books of Kings speak of the glory of God filling the temple.
  • The Chronicles describe the glorious coming king, referring to Jesus, the King of Kings.
  • Ezra depicts Jesus as the Lord of our fathers.
  • Job says clearly that the Redeemer lives and is coming!
  • Esther offers a picture of Christ interceding for His people.
  • Christ appears time after time in the Psalms, including when David describes Him as “the Shepherd.”
  • Isaiah details His glorious birth.
  • Jeremiah reveals that He will be acquainted with sorrows.
  • Joel describes Him as the Hope of His people.
  • Amos tells us that Jesus is the judge of all nations.
  • Obadiah warns of the coming eternal One who has an eternal kingdom.
  • Jonah offers a picture of Jesus being dead for three days, then coming back to life to preach repentance.
  • Zephaniah says that He will be the King over Israel.
  • Zachariah is the prophet who speaks of Jesus riding on a colt.
  • Malachi is the one who calls Him the Son of Righteousness.

Can you see it? The entire Old Testament points toward Jesus Christ as Savior, and if you miss that, you’ve missed the entire point of the Bible.  That is why we must be more than New Testament believers.  The New Testament is not understaood without the Old Testament and the Old Testament is not understood without the New Testament.  Someone has said, “The New Testament is in the Old Testament concealed; and the Old Testament is in the New Testament revealed.”

Jesus is the Messiah of the Old and New Testament

The Only One Who brings salvation

And is what the Bible is all about.

This is God’s Word For Today … This Is Grace For The Journey

Rest and Rejoice in this eternal truth!

Pastor Terry

Ephesians 4:7 – “But to each one of us grace has been given as Christ apportioned it.”

Hebrews 4:16 – “Let us then approach the throne of grace with confidence, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help us in our time of need.”

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Ripping Through The Roof

Grace For The Journey

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  I spend a great deal of my time as a pastor in ministry to a great many hurting people.  It is a wonderful privilege to be used by God in the lives of others and to help them fix their eyes on Jesus in the midst of their storms.

The Bible tells us that Jesus is the Friend who sticks closer to us than a brother.  We have no need to rip through a roof to get to Him who has promised never to leave us or forsake us, but some situations seem so desperate; I know I would do it if I thought I had to, and I’m sure you would too.

The Bible presents us such a case in Luke 5:17-19, “Now it happened on a certain day, as He was teaching, that there were Pharisees and teachers of the law sitting by, who had ocme out of every town of Galilee, Judea, and Jerusalem.  And the power of the Lord was present to heal them.  Then behold, men brought on a bed a man who was paralyzed, whom they sought to bring in and lay before him.  And when they could not find how they might bring him in, because of the crowd, they went up on the housetop and let him down with his bed through the tiling into the midst before Jesus.  When He saw their faith, He said to him, “’Man, your sins are forgiven you.’”

Take a moment to think about the great faith in this passage – not only the faith of the paralyzed man, but also that of his friends, who were willing to rip through the roof to get their friend to Jesus.  This is a powerful challenge in this passage directed at you and me!

In the days when Jesus walked the earth, the homes were generally made of stone with flat roofs constructed of a mixture of straw and mud.  On an outside wall you could find a stairway that led to the roof.  The friends of the paralyzed man were filled with so much faith in Jesus that when they could not find a way to get to Jesus because of the crowd, they climbed the stairs and ripped through the roof to get the man to their Redeemer.

The Bible teaches about the power of faith as small as a mustard seed (Luke 17:6).  Well, this is the faith as big as a roof-ripping machine!  Jesus responded to their faith with forgiveness and healing.  Do you see how the faith of the friends of the paralyzed man impacted his life?  They refused to let anything stand in their way of bringing their friend to Jesus.

So the question we all must ask ourselves is this . . .

“What kind of faith do I demonstrate when it comes to the friends and

family members who have never trusted in Jesus as Savior & Lord?”

To be sure, we are not the ones responsible for another’s salvation.  Only Jesus saves!  But God is pleased to use means, and that is what we are in the hands of the Almighty: a foreordained means for His foreordained ends.  The Bible tells us in Ephesians 2:10 that we “are His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand that we should walk in them.”

Are we willing to be used by God in the lives of others to bring them to Jesus?  Are we willing to get past any of the obstacles that stand in our way?  Those obstacles might be . . .

  • ·Fear
  • ·Doubt
  • ·Indifference
  • ·Circumstances
  • ·Self-protection
  • ·Unforgiveness

Think about this . . .

God had ordained that paralyzed man to be saved through the faith of his friends.

God has also ordained some to be saved through you.

The key is that we simply are to be faithful

To do what God has called us to do

And leave the results up to Him.

We are called by God to be used of God as instruments for the salvation of others.  The only thing left for us to do is to overcome every obstacle that stands in the way of answering that call.

Are you ready for some roof-ripping?

Be faithful and see what God will do!

This is God’s Word For Today … This Is Grace For The Journey

Rest and Rejoice in this eternal truth!

Pastor Terry

Ephesians 4:7 – “But to each one of us grace has been given as Christ apportioned it.”

Hebrews 4:16 – “Let us then approach the throne of grace with confidence, so that we may receive mercy and find grace to help us in our time of need.”

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